Sled Dogs

Alaskan Malamute

This Alaskan Malamute has dense, layered fur as a shield from severe weather. The nomadic Mahlemuts, an Inuit people of northwestern Alaska, first bred the Alaskan Malamute as a sled dog to haul their belongings. Ranging from light gray to black in color, Alaskan Malamutes are also popular as pets and show dogs.

 

Richard Kolar/Animials Animals

"Alaskan Malamute," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 96 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1995 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Siberian Husky

The Siberian husky has a dense coat of fur that allows it to weather harsh climates. Developed as a sled dog in the 1800s by the Chukchi people of northeastern Asia, the Siberian husky is a popular breed in sled-dog competition despite being a medium-sized dog. Males of this breed usually measure 53 to 60 cm (21 to 23.5 in) high at the shoulder and females are slightly smaller.

Renee Stockdale/Animials Animals

"Siberian Husky," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 96 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1995 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Samoyed

The Samoyed, named after the Samoyed people of Siberia, was originally trained to pull sleds and guard reindeer. It has recently become a popular show dog as well.

Dorling Kindersley

"Samoyed," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 96 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1995 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.


Eskimo Dog, any of several mixed breeds of working and hunting dogs of northern North America, particularly Labrador and Greenland, related to the Malamute, the Samoyed, and the Siberian husky. They are valuable in hunting seals, musk-oxen, and polar bears, for pulling sledges with heavy loads in winter, and for carrying packs in summer. Teams of Eskimo dogs, pulling loads half the total weight of the team, can average about 40 km (25 mi) a day on long trips; the American explorer Donald B. MacMillan once drove a team a distance of 160 km (100 mi) in 18 hr.

The Eskimo dog typically has a massive, rugged body with a double coat, the outer coat consisting of long heavy hair, the undercoat of wool. The undercoat is so dense and heat-retaining that the dog can sleep outdoors in temperatures ranging from -51° to -56° C (-60° to -70° F). The dog may be white, black, black and white, or varieties of gray, tan, and buff; it is usually either white with a black head or white with markings of silver-gray. It has a wedge-shaped head, a flat skull, strong jaws, small and deep-set eyes, a short neck, a deep and wide chest, and large paws with thick pads. The male dog is from 50 to 63 cm (20 to 25 in) high at the shoulder; weight varies from 23 to 38 kg (50 to 85 lb). The female is somewhat smaller. When raised in a home or kennel, the Eskimo dog is gentle and makes a good pet.

"Eskimo Dog," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 96 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1995 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. (c) Funk & Wagnalls Corporation. All rights reserved.

Husky Pups